art world expo vancouver

Logo on Our Luggage-Painting Dreams International Art Tours

by Monika Blichar

Each year, we are fortunate enough to take several trips related to arts and culture locally and internationally. In 2017, we have several trips planned including workshops in Toronto, REO Rafting in North Bend, British Columbia, Wroclaw, Poland in Europe and Las Vegas, USA. Maybe more, who knows! We love to travel, see and make new art while participating or leading workshops and conferences related to the arts and culture sector.

As I’m sitting at the Vancouver International Airport waiting to board my flight to Toronto for a world languages workshop I’m attending this week, I wanted to introduce our current and past sponsors for our annual Logo on our Luggage Program. In what began as an unconventional way to advertise local businesses in Vancouver, has now become one of my favourite accents to our annual travels. Not only do I look forward to traveling and seeing new things, meeting new people and enjoying new cultures, I also enjoy sharing passionate companies with my network via these experiences! It is a win win for everyone!

Our Logo on Our Luggage Sponsors past and present include: 

Twin Peaks Construction www.twinpeaksconstruction.com 

Art by Edy https://www.facebook.com/artbyedy/ 

Personal Travel Management-Robyn Freels https://personaltravel.ca/travel-agents/robyn-freels/ 

Carolyn Bruce Designs www.carolynbrucedesigns.com 

Coastal Storm Gallery

http://www.coastalstormgallery.com

Daddy Blogger http://daddyblogger.com

Jirehstone Vancouver www.jirehstone.com

Daughter for a Day Senior’s Care http://daughterforaday.ca/ 

MAB Art Studio & Boutique Gallery www.mabartstudio.com 

Make and Break Arts Foundation https://www.facebook.com/Make-and-Break-Arts-Foundation-154109301295870/

Painting Dreams International Art Tours https://www.facebook.com/Painting-Dreams-International-Art-Tours-968374583192403/ 

Art World Expo www.theartworldexpo.com 

World of Hydration

http://www.worldofhydration.com

Please connect with us and these great companies online! They each have something unique to share including construction, travel, senior’s care, art, jewellery and more! We will be posting regularly on our feeds about what makes these companies unique so stay tuned!

In exchange for a minimal advertising rate of $100, these companies not only contribute to our travel expenses, workshop fees or program development, they receive some excelelnt exposure via our numerous networks including Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and our YouTube videos. I’m excited to share the works of these companies and invite you to have a look at the advertising program HERE We have only 7 spots left for the rest of the 2017 season!

Thank you to our past and ongoing sponsors and affiliates! We appreciate all your support for BC Arts and Culture! 

Interview with Beatrice Lucia Grimoldi

by Monika Blichar

Beatrice Lucia Grimoldi came across our radar because of our good friend Yves Decary and Cynthia Skabar at Future Hair Training Centre in Vancouver. I catch up with her today and ask her a few questions about her art, Italian background and aspirations for the future.

1-What inspired you to start make up?
Since I can remember, I’ve always been a creative! I’ve always loved colouring, shaping, and creating beauty for the eye. I started to get into the art of makeup as a teenager. At that time, I was mostly driven to making women feel as confident and as beautiful as they could be. I’ve always been a firm believer that beauty is in everyone, and I just really wanted to help out the ones who had difficulties in seeing it for themselves.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

2-How did you get into body painting?
Once I decided that makeup would be my future, I enrolled with the best makeup school in Milan. I needed validation, I had to show my very traditional Italian family that artistic creativity was a gainful and admirable pursuit. I needed to show them that I was worth it. My time at my makeup school was one of the most amazing experiences of my life. I felt like I was all of a sudden back to life. Like the magic of spring when existence comes alive with colors and perfumes after a long grey winter. My imagination, inspiration and creativity awaken, I took a course on body painting and special effects. This is the moment when my zest for beauty collided with my untamed imagination! I’d found it!! Body painting is my freedom. I consider body painting as an awakening of character, color and vitality.
3-Do you have a make up artist that you idolize?

Alex Box. Innovative, unbelievable creative skills aside, she understands the deep emotional attachment and the connection created with a person when becoming a canvas. I look up to her as an artist and as a human being.

4-You do different projects as seen on your instagram. What kinds of projects you like working on the most?

I do love photography the most. It gives you such creative freedom. One of the best parts is brainstorming with the other creative minds on the set. The photographer, assistant, stylist, makeup artist and hairstylist coming together with more and more ideas being generated. Everyone offers their best to achieve the same goal. Watching the magic happening and the ideas coming to life, such a thrilling feeling!!

5-Where do you see yourself as an artist in 5 years?
Having just recently moved to Canada, I’m in the process of rebuilding my future and my career here. So if I close my eyes now and daydream about my future, I see myself working with photography, doing editorials as well as private clients that ask me to make them feel as beautiful as they really are.
6-Can you give us any hints about your design for this year’s Art World Expo body painting competition?

Mmmmh…I don’t know if I can do that! 🙂 Just kidding! 🙂 Let’s just say I’m looking at the 7 Wonders of the World in their primitive, natural form!

Interview with Body Painter Devon Burbank

by Monika Blichar

Burbank, Devon, Fin.jpg

1-When did you know you wanted to be a make up artist?

I think I realized that I wanted to be a makeup artist when I recognized that there are more options than painting on a flat canvas. I really enjoy the 3D aspect of the art form and also that it’s more socially acceptable to talk to living models rather than an intimate object.

2-Why do you love working with make up?

I like having the freedom of being creative while also simultaneously following the natural bone structure for each person’s unique characteristics. It’s much more challenging being able to walk in to something with so much artistic inventiveness, but also having to follow the rules of realism at the same time. It’s a perfect mixture of art and balance!

Burbank, Devon, The Lava Mutant.JPG

3-You won at the IMATS in 2016. What was your inspiration for your character submission at that competition?

I’ve always been inspired by the Star Wars franchise and the creatures that lived in it, and though it was such a crazy random happenstance that it was chosen as the theme for that years IMATS competition, Star Wars was, ironically enough, my inspiration. That being said, when we were told to create a unique character complete with costume and a story, I immediately started to plan one around the desert planet of Jakku. I was inspired by the story line of Ray and her struggle of living alone on such a deserted bleak desert planet and wanted the thriftiness and cunning of her character to come across through my own.

devonburbankIMATS.jpg

4-You do make up and prosthetics. What has been your favorite character design so far?

It’s incredibly difficult choosing my favorite design, I put hours of planning and preparation in to each creature and they all hold a special place in my heart. Though I think it’s safe to say that the most entertaining character designs so far were when I turned my two best friends in to Mike and Sully from my favorite childhood film, Monsters Inc. It was a strangely satisfying feeling getting to see the animated characters that I held so close to my heart for all those years be given life and personality from the two people that now share that same spot.


5-Where do you see yourself in 5 years? Do you have any goals for your business?

In 5 years I’d like to be able to look back on all that I’ve done and be proud of what I’ve accomplished in that short amount of time. I would love to be able to work as a full time freelance makeup artist that specifies in creature design and prosthetics, but at the same time I don’t think that I could ever limit myself to just one form of makeup artistry since it’s such an amazing art form. So I guess the goal for my freelance makeup artistry business is to have as many opportunities as possible so I can enjoy the unexpected journey of where it takes me.

6-What are you looking forward to the most about competing in Art World Expo this year?

I’m looking forward the 6 hour time-span that we have for painting, usually I’m used to working with smaller durations of 1-3 hours so having that extra time will be wonderful for detail work. I’m also looking forward to seeing what the other artists bring to the table for the ‘7 Wonders of the World’ theme, each person has such a unique art style which will cause some truly incredible ideas and designs.

To learn more about Devon Burbank, have a look at her FACEBOOK PAGE or WEBSITE 

 

The Illusionist: An Interview with Carolina de la Cajiga

by Alyssa Laube

Annitya (9710) - CarolinaDelaCajiga

“Annitya” will be up for auction at the Art World Expo. Proceeds support Make and Break Arts Foundation.

Carolina de la Cajiga doesn’t call herself an artist but an “illusionist and interpreter”. To describe what she does in photography, sculpture, and painting, she explains “I create illusions by transforming my ideas into something tangible”.

Her vision is different than reality, she “adds or removes from what is there” in order to feel satisfied with the finished product. In her Portraits of Canada and Canadian Divas series, she replaced hair with flowers. In Post-Modern Glyphs, she removed the backgrounds surrounding her subject: cable knots. What used to be behind – buildings, clouds, trees – was digitally cleared away in order to obtain a clean image with only the knots visible. “My goal is simple: to represent what I see in my mind. “It’s all aesthetics, beauty,” said de la Cajiga.

Over the past few years, her work has been focused mostly on photography but, as anything she does, it is her own kind of photography. Her most recent series is “shooting dynamic light that lasts atto seconds (the smallest unit to measure the speed of light).” De la Cajiga takes hundreds of shots and carefully picks the ones she believes have the most potential. What follows is a multi hour-long process that turns those photos into de la Cajiga’s vision for the piece through the use of various methods and computer programs. “The result is a photograph that asks the audience to question whether [parts of] it ever existed -what you see is not what is, but what your mind sees… “The more of these shots I process, the more complex and intricate the images are turning out to be.” Not finding a term to describe her technique, she coined the word “Katharosgraphy” from the Greek Katharos = to scratch, to clean, to purify, and Graphy = process. Coincidentally, Katharos also means oak tree which is what Cajiga, her last name, means.  At the Art World Expo, she will be exhibiting this series of work.

Many of her other works also play with altering reality. The series, City In Flux, is based on illusion and “bend[ing] architectural protocols”. Here, she twists and morphs Vancouver buildings. In What If ? she places Las Soldaderas (“civilian women who made significant contributions to both the federal and rebel armies during the Mexican Revolution of 1910”) into other important events throughout history. Even in her photography of everyday life, such as Construction – Workers, Lifting of Backhoe, Invisible in Neon, and Rain City, she added or deleted components that are unidentifiable to the public eye. Only de la Cajiga knows what did and did not exist in the moment when the photo was captured. The audience is left to wonder.

Carolina will be part of the “Love in Any Language” exhibition at the Ferry Building Gallery in West Vancouver, 1414 Argyle Avenue, West Vancouver, February 2 – 21, 2016. The opening reception will be February 2, 6 – 8 pm, and Meet the Artists is on February 6, 2 -3 pm.

You will also be able to see her work and catch up with De la Cajiga at her new studio at the 195 Pemberton Studios bustling artist community in North Vancouver.

Take a look at Carolina de la Cajiga’s collections yourself on her website. Better still, see them in person at this year’s Vancouver Art World Expo. She is in the process of finalizing a new website, http://www.delacajigafineart.com, to display the Katharosgraphy artwork. Stay tuned!

 

Dream of India: Stunning New photography Project Seeks to Paint a Picture of a Diverse and Vibrant Land

india1india2

India is arguably one of the most diverse and beautiful nations on the planet, which makes it a great subject for artistic photography. With its amazing mix of cultures and postcard scenery, there are endless opportunities. Croatian travellers Jelena Nikolic and Sanjin Kastelan are looking to share their journey through this rich and colourful nation via the media of video, photography, and blogging. They fell in love with India after working at a yoga retreat there last year, and would love to help others to do the same. Their photos are truly stunning, and really manage to capture the country’s beauty.

Jelena and Sanjin are looking to fund their project via the crowdfunding platform Indiegogo. One of their focuses will be food, as they wish to display the unique culinary offerings that India has to offer. The overall aim of this project is to alter the way in which people perceive India. Oftentimes, when people think India, they think of squalor and poverty. In reality, these things exist in every nation, and are only one side to India. Perhaps this project could help to challenge preconceptions and replace prejudices with a new, more positive image. It is a fascinating artistic project that uses photos to achieve social good, which is one of the many functions of this multifaceted art form. Check it out for yourself at https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/dream-of-india–3#/

Aidan Liban-Street Artist in London

London bigben at night, UK, United Kingdom

London Big Ben at night, UK, United Kingdom

Aidan Liban first started doing street art in London in 2013. When he debuted his cops and robbers street art in 2013. The concept was fantastic.  The tongue-in cheek of it is essentially the most poignant aspect of it. The fact that a robbery is taking place whilst a police van is in the background makes this artwork so daring, fun and unique.

He’s always had a flair for stencil and graffiti art and his body of work best demonstrates that. Here are some of his pieces:

cowboyinfinty (1)

Pictured 1 Cops and Robbers (2013)

aligaroo (1)

Pictured 2: Kangaroo Rumble with the King (2015)

000_0007 (1)

Pictured 3: London Jungle (2013)

Last but not least, earlier this year Aidan showcased another piece that blew people’s mind. ‘The kangaroo Rumble with the king’. It’s his most elaborate work to date and requires some serious skills. He demonstrated an incredible level of artistic skill to create this magnificent street art. This is based on a stencil of a photo of one of Muhammad Ali’s famous fights. And by adding a kangaroo to the mix it’s a great juxtaposition which is typical of graffiti street art. This makes it this light hearted and magical.

You can view more of his work on his twiiter : https://twitter.com/AidanLiban_Art

And check out his Facebook: Aidan Liban Art

 

The Great Idea: An Interview with Painter Leanna Litvinenko

An Art World Expo Spotlight

by Alyssa Laube

leanna 3

Before her attendance at Emily Carr, Leanna Litvinenko’s artwork was all about realism. During her high school years, she spent her time copying photographs “and getting them to look as realistic as possible.” This natural inclination sprouted from the presence of Classical Realism throughout her childhood and resulted in a colourful collection of oil paintings featuring bold, detailed faces. In fact, this practice was what initially brought Litvinenko to Emily Carr. Yet, strangely enough, it is also where her art strayed from the concrete and into the abstract. After some personal reflection at the university, Litvinenko began to focus on “a great idea behind something” for the first time. Today, it is a part of her everyday work.

leanna 2

“I was asked to question everything, including myself, my intentions, and whether my art has the ability to impact the world in any way,” said Leanna, about how Emily Carr inspired her current pieces. “I see a lot of parallels between the way I live my life and the way I handle my abstract paintings. In my current work, there are many layers. The process is quite chaotic but the result is harmonious, kind of like my personality. That brings me satisfaction because it confirms that I am staying true to myself and, therefore, am on the right track.”

While her time in school did push Livinenko to ask the bigger questions, travelling abroad greatly influenced her artistry as well. After visiting Northern India in 2013, she was “taken by the culture, the vastness of Himalayan mountains, and the freedom [she] felt.” In Europe, she studied the great works of the Renaissance and improved her understanding of human anatomy. New York’s Museum of Modern Art introduced her to abstract impressionism and sent her on a “learning frenzy” about the genre. Finally, growing up in Ukraine, specifically, left its impression on the artist with its vibrant culture. Specifically, Leanna adored Ukrain’s many street artists. “Those artists are who I looked up to growing up, and I am still in awe of their technical abilities.,” she happily recalled. “I could not find a way to express the impact it all had on my psyche with realistic paintings,” said Litvinenko, about her globetrotting. Thus, her abstract work was born.

The work itself is multi-media; the paintings are created using a combination of chalk pastels, ink, watercolour, spray paint, acrylic paint, and gels. In terms of process, Leanna likes to demonstrate her “great idea” of chance. The work revolves around “lucky mistakes” or, as put by Litvenenko, “unexpected turning points in the process, conceived by the paint itself, that take the work in a whole new direction.” She sees herself as nothing more than a “necessary active agent”, despite constructing everything from the canvas to the piece itself.

leanna 4

“Normally, I begin the painting near the centre by drawing with pastels and mixing it with liquefied acrylic, followed by a spill of water. After, I spray the wet surface with spray paint. The chemical reaction between these two mediums creates an interesting design. I repeat those actions until I see something I like,” Litvenko explained, about her artistic process. “I can’t get too attached to anything I make in the process, as the next layer might cover it completely. If I get too attached to something in the piece, I treat is as a precious object and the painting stays incomplete. One of my professors told me, ‘Don’t be afraid to kill your babies’, referring to the destruction of unsuccessful creations that inhibit the ability to move forward. Now, I work by that mantra, and it has been a wonderful ride so far.”

Leanna1

Leanna will be exhibiting at this years Art World Expo in Vancouver.

Buy tickets to the event here or visit Leanna’s site to learn more about her or purchase a piece.