artbc

Final Call for our Art World Expo Christmas Fair Vendors! 

Are you an artisan or independent rep looking for a holiday event to participate in this year? Look no further and join our exciting Christmas Fair this year! 


We have a limited number of tables left for vendors at our Christmas Fair on December 16! Submit your registration today here: https://theartworldexpo.com/exhibitor-information/ Questions? Call Monika Blichar 6049996177 

We love to small businesses and Artisans and our Christmas Fair will be no exception to sharing the love for all things unique and local this December! 


Thank you to Two of Hearts boutique in Kits for donating $5-$25 gift cards to spend in store! Lots of raffle prizes every 30 minutes! 

Preview products, join the convo and connect with participants on our Official Facebook Event Page

When you attend this COMPLIMENTARY ENTRY EVENT, you’ll find: 
-Over 50 vendor tables including art, jewellery, fashion, hand knit goods, make up, skin care, chocolate, baked goods, kids accessories, essential oils, dog accessories, home decor, and health and wellness products and services and much more! Everything you need in one venue to complete your holiday shopping and networking! Ask our vendors about collaborations, participating in your events or if you’re a gallery or boutique owner, come browse to see if you could work with one of our Artisans in 2018! 


-Fashion Shows by John Pfaff, Carolyn Bruce Steampunk Jewellery, and West Coast Hatters on models provided by award winning female body builder fitness models from Team Fitness! Yes! Exciting! 


-Cheeses Crust Food Truck-Gourmet Grilled Cheese Sandwiches and Drinks! Really good sandwiches! 


-Raffles every 30 minutes-Prizes from local vendors and of course, many of our sponsors from Art World Expo! Tickets sold on site! 

-First 100 people through the doors receive a complimentary goody bag! No purchase necessary! Just be one of the first 100 people at 11:00am sharp! 

-Face Painting for kids and adults by award winning body painter and visual artist Francoise Boise ($10/person) She’s amazing! Don’t worry, she will do Holiday themed paints too! 


-Silent Auction Benefiting Make and Break Arts Foundation-all proceeds support independent Artisans and Arts Programs and Exhibitions in BC. It’s a win win! (Huge line up of awesome stuff to bid on-great for holiday gift ideas and of course-gifts for ourselves!) 

-Arts & Crafts Station for Kids-leave them at the craft station and go shop and mingle! We have you covered! 

-Finally, when you’re all done, take a photo at our photo booth with visitors from the North Pole! Capture a memory and celebrate Christmas 2017 with us! 

Current vendors: 

Monika Blichar

Art by Edy

Carolyn Bruce Designs – Steampunk Jewelry**FASHION SHOW**

West Coast Hatters**FASHION SHOW**

John Pfaff Art & Fashion**FASHION SHOW**

Fashion Show models sponsored by Team Fitness-Award Winning Female Body Builders from BC! 

LumberJax Custom Wooden Jewelry 

Karolyn’s Tupperware

Inner Harmonious Peace

Kathline Essential Oils Accessories

Jennifer Haase, Mary Kay Independent Beauty Consultant

SPOIL YOURSELF, Cristina De Vellis

Jessica’s Homemade Alfajores-Baked Goods

Fifth Avenue Collection by Pardeep

Younique, Amanda Cherewick

The Sweet Doodle

Whisk Premium Matcha

Copper Paw Designs

Coastal Storm Gallery

Dagmar Doubkova Herbal Life

Bodacious Butterflies

Scentsy Kristi Weaver

SweetLegs Vancouver with Julia

Love Eco Jewels

Spain Gourmet Canada

Radiant Life Hoops & Styles 

Petite Hippo

Earth Meets Spirit

Boise Art Works-Face Painting for Kids On Site $10/each

Deanna ArtFORMS

Diamond Movement

Andrea Renée Blackett MONAT

Diva’s Niche

All Day Shine by Julie SeneGence Independent Distributor # 384814

Crafts By Julia

Bryce Musil Azrael’s Forge Gems and Fine Jewelry

Taylore Mcmanne Jewellery
 

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The Dreamer An Interview with Hajni Yosifov

By Alyssa Laube

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About: For Transylvanian painter and poet, Hajni Yosifov, art is all about self-discovery. Her paintings (“painted diaries/journals”, or “dreamscapes”, as she calls them) use bold colours and heavy texture to evoke emotions of love, wonder, and struggle. Despite starting out her artistic career as a jewellery designer, Hajni has found her true passion in painting, and will be exhibiting at this year’s Expo.

When you mention the “idea of existing” as a key concept in your work, what do you mean?

My artistic journey is more than seeking; it’s a chance to go on, deeply and permanently, into the idea of existing. Art is how I record life.

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The way that you’ve described your work on your page is quite poetic. Do you write poetry?

The dance between words and pictures is unlike anything else. Nothing compares with the discovery of your own verse, and some of my paintings gives my mind the power of words. “The Dreamer” is my self portrait in words.

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Which artists inspire you?

There are many inspiring artists, but none touches my heart and soul like Emily Carr.

How did growing up in Transylvania (and then moving to Canada) influence you?

When I came in Canada in 1990, the course of my life changed. My first show happened to be at Hamilton Art Gallery, where I met the gallery Director, Ted Pietrzak. His encouragement and guidance led me to the most rewarding journey as an artist. That was the beginning.

How did you get started in jewellery design?

At the end of the high school I decided to become a jeweller. It was a fascinating process between melting gold and polishing the final piece. The finished piece always became someone’s treasure.

How did you discover that painting was your true passion?

Painting must be my true passion, because I paint after working at my job, even if I don’t have a showing or commissioned piece. I’m painting when I’m hopeful or hopeless.

Would you describe your work as abstract and why/why not?

I don’t consider my art abstract because abstract art seeks to achieve its effect using shapes, forms, colours and textures without representing an external reality. I call mine “dreamscapes”, because when I paint, my intention is to touch an emotional chord with such intensity that I can’t distinguish if it’s pain or happiness.

How do you like to use colour and texture in your art?

My inspiration comes from a thought, building textures and bright colours, and then balancing with soft pastel.

You’ve participated in over 190 exhibitions. Is there one, or a few, that stand out in your memory and why?

After over 240 exhibitions, each of them is important. I had so many amazing moments and met so many people that inspired me.

How do you think that your work reflects the “awakening of life”?

I’m collecting bits of nature, human forms, and sparkles of light and putting them back into my artwork romantically. The awakening of life is an endless wonder.

How have you found your “new self” through your art?

I’m an artist; this is what I do. My art is the bridge between me and the world.

Why is creating art important to you?

My art gives me the courage to be vulnerable, and to be myself.

What will you be showing at the Expo?

At the Art World Expo, I’m showing my recent work. As a collection, each painting orchestrates the mood and story behind it. The theme, ”Shades of Love”, echoes through each of them.
You can see or purchase Hajni’s work at this year’s Expo, or:
http://www.absolutearts.com/portfolios/h/hajni/.

You can also follow her on Facebook and Twitter!

twinpeaksconstruction

Thank you to our Platinum Sponsor Twin Peaks Construction!

www.twinpeaksconstruction.com 

An Interview with Diva’s Niche Designer Rebecca Fisher

Interview With . . . Rebecca Fisher

by Alyssa Laube 

 

A Quick Autobiography

Throughout my life I have been many things – a daughter, wife, mother, llama farmer, business owner, teacher and now student. And now, as a recent breast cancer survivor, I find the experience of mastectomy, chemo and radiation to be a catalyst to many life changes. Now I am enjoying, with renewed excitement and appreciation, the preciousness of life. Divorced and with a decidedly different external landscape, I find myself drawing on my creative side with much more intensity, truly believing in the power of healing through art. I am recent graduate Capilano University Textile Arts Program where I spent two blissful intense years honing the skills I have garnered over a lifetime. My current work involves explorations in millinery and accessories finding these small canvasses the perfect venue for my creative energies.”

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When and how did you first get started in textiles? 

I remember using my mother’s sewing machine when I was 5.  I also remember taking my sister’s clothes and cutting them up to sew into Barbie clothes. I’ve been doing it since then.

 

Did you know you would want to do it as a profession?

My grandma came to Vancouver from London, England in 1905. She supported her family by sewing and selling smocked dresses out of her children’s clothing store on Robson. When I was 9, she taught me to smock. It was a very serious endeavor for her and she made me swear on a bible never to tell anyone how to do it ,as one day I would make my living smocking. When I had completed a baby dress, I went back to see her and she went over every stitch, folded the dress in her lap, and said, “It is saleable.” That was the hardest jury I have ever passed! I knew at that point that I had an aptitude for textiles and it was a natural progression.

 

What about working in the field do you like/dislike?

I love the alchemy of marking and colouring cloth – of taking something plain and giving it life. It’s a celebration of colour. I create these textiles with the intention that they will be worn and lived in. The only thing I really dislike is that there aren’t more hours in a day!

 

You use both natural and unnatural dyes. What is the reason for this, and how are they different?

I am by no means a purist as far as attachment to a specific technique goes. Having said that, I love each for their own unique vocabulary. The natural dyes only work on natural fibres and that brings a richness that is unrivalled by anything manmade. I love the smell of the silk and wool in a dye pot of onion skin tied with rose leaves and eucalyptus. The colour palette is soft and deep and reminiscent of an old secret garden hidden away for centuries. I also feel an attachment to the many generations of natural dyers and artists before me when I work in this medium, as if my hands are not the only ones placing and wrapping leaves and flowers against cloth. It’s like a collaboration with the earth and my ancestors.

The manmade dyes have a vibrancy and colourfastness not achievable with natural dyes. There is an immediacy in their usage that appeals to my magpie-like attention span. There is also an element of repeatability and reliability that is missing in natural dyes. The dyes that I use on the printed hosiery are polyester-specific and can only be used on manmade fibres. They are particularly successful on hosiery and poly satins, hence the development of the line of printed panty hose and scarves. 

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How did your family influence you as an artist?

As a child, I spent a great deal of time with my grandfather. He taught me about the colour wheel using tempura paints mixed by my mother on a wooden easel built by my father. I guess you could say that my artistic side was recognized and supported. I also spent a great deal of time in my grandparent’s antique store which may account for my obsession with textiles. I remember the thick velvets and laces and today, lace images still find their way into my work. My father was an amazing gardener and I think that influenced my colour sense as well as a love for the intricacies of different leaves and flowers. My great grandmother and great aunt lived on Lasquiti Island for many years and collected many books full of pressed flowers which were put into pictures and cards. I was always mesmerized by the delicate petals pressed flat – like I was looking into the secret domain of fairies – or something equally romantic. I still have a picture over my bed made by my great grandmother with pressed ferns and flowers. The aesthetic is quite similar to the imagery on my fern imprinted hose.

 

Do you have any training or are you self-taught?

I have spent a lifetime exploring textile arts and am a recent graduate of the Caplilano University Textile Arts Program – a wonderful program that was my gift to myself for surviving chemo therapy after breast cancer 5 years ago. This is currently the final term that this 40 year old program will be running – one of the many Arts cuts at Capilano University. It’s such a shame. This program offers students a skill base not found anywhere else.

I was born in Vancouver and have always lived in this area. the West coast imagery is part of my soul. There is never any shortage of inspiration. It can be found on short walk down the road to the river or just out in the backyard. The little fellow that was the model for my raccoon hat was a constant visitor last year. Always by himself, he would come in the evening and hang around in the backyard, watching us with great curiosity. The skunk hat also had a live model although not so cute. He sprayed the dog 4 times last year!

 

Considering the exaggeration of natural elements in your work, how does living in B.C. affect you? 

Nature has both a fragility and a great strength. It has beauty that is constant and changing. I am always collecting rocks and twigs and leaves whose designs speak to me. My china cabinet is full of skulls collected from under a bald eagles nest. They sit perched on my grandmothers china. Both aesthetics equally precious to me.

 

Why do you feel drawn to nature?

I don’t know that it was ever a conscious idea or decision. You doodle and draw and paint and slop dye around – Some things appeal and some don’t. I very rarely have something turn out the same as the idea had when I began. Designs morph as you go. I have a very free-flow style of working that follows through the rest of my life as well. Sometimes I think it would be easier to approach things in an organized and structured fashion, but I have come to realize that you can’t fight your brain.

 

How do you like to use color in your clothing? 

I love colour. It’s all about mood. Sometimes it’s playful with bright colours and other times more subdued and calming. Each day is a new day.

 

You make both accessories and garments. Which do you prefer, and how are they different?

I probably make more accessories than garments. They are a smaller canvas and I can experiment and work out different ideas. If that experimentation is successful, then it often progresses to a garment.

 

How long does it take you to complete one piece, usually?

I don’t really work with things one at a time, so it’s hard to say. If I am doing hats, I’m washing fleece and as it dries I am carding other fleece and felting blanks. While they are drying on hat blocks I am needle-felting the features on other ones. It’s like an assembly line – a skill I developed through years of hairdressing. The panty hose are the same kind of thing. I am painting the designs on paper, while its drying I am collecting and preparing the ferns and leaves, then laying them out in stacks and heat setting them. I do tend to do things in runs. If I am making scarves then its a scarf day or a felting day or a flower day, mostly because each thing requires a different set of equipment and I have a small space to work in.

 

When you are picking which objects to incorporate into the cloths, what do you look for? 

Sometimes on a walk I will discover plants with interesting shapes or in the thrift store i’ll come across some really tacky doily with a lot of texture that is perfect. I feel like mostly, the things find me. Like the other day, I took the dog to the off-leash dog park and he shot off after a duck with me chasing after him. During that little adventure, I discovered the ferns that were growing from the trees – slightly softer and smaller than the ones I had been using. I was curious to see if they would work and how they would translate on to cloth. I loved them so I plan to go back later this week and pick some more.I am always careful to pick gently and not take too much, especially with things like lichens.

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Explain the process of making those objects a part of the fabric. Is it difficult?

Sometimes I will paint the actual leaves, others I will make silk screens of the leaf images and screen the dye on. Sometimes I draw the images by hand, or a combination of all 3. It’s not any more difficult than another technique but it does require a fairly in-depth understanding of how the dye works and some specialized equipment.

 

How did you learn to do it?

I learned my basic skills at the Textile Arts Program at Cap U and have actually just completed a directed study to develop this technique. I wanted to take advantage of the last term the program is running to further my experimentation.

 

Where do you find your materials?

With the leaf imprinting, any time I leave the house I usually find something. My pockets are always full of leaves and twigs and seeds. The hats I buy use local specialty fleeces and  I process them myself. The fabrics are often rescued or vintage.

 

Do you ever work with others professionally, or do you prefer to work alone? 

I love collaborations and I love creating in solitude. Sometimes it’s nice to have someone of a similar mindset around to assure you that you are not crazy and to bounce ideas off of.

 

What is your favorite piece to make?

Every piece I make is my favourite piece in that moment. Although I have to say I am really enjoying the panty hose currently.

 

Which fabrics do you use for each garment? How do you treat each one differently?

Each fibre and fabric type – wool, cellulose, and polyesters – all require different dyes and treatments. I use wools for hats, scarves and shawls which may also incorporate pieces of silks or polyester.

 

How do you experiment?

Everything I make is an experiment. I am a messy artist, not by intention. It’s just that when I am working, I am oblivious to the rest of the universe. 

 

How do you get such original ideas? Do you have any ways to encourage yourself creatively?

I think it is important to spend time with other creative types to keep the energy up. It’s also important to give myself time to create; turning off the phone and working undisturbed even if its just to mix dyes and sweep the floor or unroll fabric. I try to do my initial experiments without attachment to the outcome. I fine tune an idea before committing it to a 500 dollar piece of cloth. Sometimes doing something in a completely foreign medium is a great creative boost.

 

Do you have any other jobs or hobbies?

I foster high risk youth in the other part of my life. I like to garden and I like to cook.

 

How does your personal life affect your professional life?

I think the high stress level from my job fuels the need for creative expression. They kind of feed off of each other. Over the last 2 decades I have managed to keep a fairly symbiotic relationship between the 2 sides of my life.

 

What are you hoping for at this year’s Art World Expo?

I am really looking forward to this expo and am excited to be involved in such a creative venture. I am hoping that my textiles will be well received and I look forward to making many creative contacts. Did I mention that I was excited?

 

Little Monsters at Art World Expo!

Interview with…

Little Monsters Studio 

by Monika Blichar 

 

 

Meet Artist Kathleen Erickson from Little Monsters Studio! 

A first time competitor, we are very excited to see what this Monster can do! Apart from having amazingly talented creative skills in face and body painting, Kat is also an accomplished visual artist creating unique pieces like custom paintings and growth charts for kids. We caught up with Kat and asked her a few questions about her experience as an artist in B.C. Here is what she had to say! 

 

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When did you start doing face/body painting?

I took a more serious approach to my painting when I turned 15 and being an artist; I was always experimenting creatively with my children and painting their faces. This helped me transition into starting Little Monsters Studio three years ago.

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Your family and work seem to blend together. How have your kids helped you with your inspiration for your business?

I find with maturity, I sometimes start to take a more scientific approach to my art. So having children helps to keep my art especially my body art & face painting fresh & unconventional.

My children & their friends always want their faces painted and it makes for great family outings like going to the Vancouver Zombie Walk or getting painted for a Seahawks game with my husband.

 

This is the first time you are competing in Art World Expo body painting competition. What are you looking forward to the most as a first time competitor?

The competitive nature of any competition will only help me to improve in my craft and with my confidence. But what I’m really looking forward to is being surrounded by so many exceptional artists and talented people.  Just being part of this contagious atmosphere and networking with my peers, will be stimulating enough. Then there’s all the great art.

 

What kinds of services and merchandise do you offer the public?

Face painting & body art are my primary sources of income, but I also sell my paintings and growth charts. During the month of October, I open up my studio to work on big Halloween projects for costume competitions and parties.

 

What is your biggest dream regarding your art and business?

My goal is to be able to support my self enough, so I am able to continue to focus on projects that I love. I adore body art and especially the Halloween spirit and just being able to continue to grow in this realm would be ideal.

 

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Welcome to the show Kat! Wishing you good luck! 

 

For more information about Little Monsters Studio, please visit Kat and her troop on her Facebook site: https://www.facebook.com/littlemonstersstudio?ref=br_tf

 

Emerging Painter Margaret Kitchen Joins The Show!

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About: Margaret Kitchen, new to Vancouver and the art scene, creates beautiful paintings of landscapes and other scenes. She works in a school teaching special needs children, and practices as an artist in her spare time.

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This is your first time at the Art World Expo. Is there anything particular you’re looking forward to?

I’m very nervous and excited just to experience it and be there to see other artists.

How were you introduced to art?

Growing up, my Mom was always creative. Not in painting, but in things like beautiful knitting and needlepoint. We would come home from dances and she would have entire outfits she’d made ready for us! Also, about 5 years ago I was looking at paintings a lot and thinking, “I want to do that.” I wanted to explore something different. Reading Drawing from the Right Side of Your Brain explained that everybody can draw and not to be afraid to make mistakes and to fail. It just sort of said, “Where are the rules? Anyone can do it.” Art is an outlet. It doesn’t have to be perfect.

How were you influenced as an artist by your heritage or home town?

Okanagan landscape is so inspiring. You go hiking or to lakes and just think, “I wish I could paint this.” It’s just so beautiful. There were great local artists and galleries, so it was really just a part of the community.

Who was your main inspiration growing up and how has it changed from then?

My Mother, because it was always important for her to be creative with her hands and to completely immerse herself.

How would you describe your style?

I love using oil paint. I love art to look like art. I really like artists like Robert Bateman. Lots of paint, thick, color, so I guess I would call my style impressionistic.

What do you consider your “big break”?

I am really glad that I met Monika. I started her art class and she and I really hit it off. Pretty much, she said “who cares! Do it and have fun,” and here I am.

How have you developed as an artist, both professionally and personally?

Personally, it’s opened up a whole new world of creativity to me. The whole journey of it has been fantastic; meeting all of these great people and producing artwork that I like. I love that now I can paint a picture and give it to someone.

What was an artwork that had a lasting effect on you? How so?

I’m so amazed all the time at the level of creativity and artistry just here in North Vancouver, just the local art that I see around. I also went to the Vancouver Art Gallery and saw Metis which blew my mind, and last winter I saw some Emily Carr which I love.

What is your favorite art gallery or event in Vancouver?

I love the art crawls. They have one in North Vancouver and one in East Vancouver.

What type of environment do you prefer to work in (i.e.: a studio, home, etc.)?

I like to be by myself sometimes but I also like to be in a studio where there are people I can bounce things off of and ask, “What do you think? What do you see?” I like to get advice, too.

Where do you get inspiration for your art?

My daughter, the landscape, other art.

What was the first piece of art you sold?

Well, I don’t sell my art! My mother in-law asked me to paint a picture of the Capilano River. It was the first painting that I thought “I like this,” and I kept it, but painted her a couple more and gave them to her. I think that if I didn’t get so attached to my paintings, I could sell them. They’re like my babies!

Is there a main theme or message to your art? If so, what is it?

It is more of pure expressionism for me.

What is your favorite (and least favorite) thing about being an artist?

My favorite thing is that it’s a way of being creative and expressing yourself – that feeling of the great escape. It’s like meditation. I haven’t found anything negative about it yet!

Did you always want to be an artist? If not, what did you want to be and  when/why did you change your mind?

I never saw myself as an artist. I wish that I had tapped into this side of myself when I was younger would have loved to be a dancer, but during the time that I was growing up, it was never something I could imagine doing. Over the last 25 or 30 years I’d squelched that side of myself. Before my work as a Teacher, I was a Dental Assistant and would wear a different sweater every day. I’ve always liked to be creative and express myself but never thought it was something I could do. I think that if I had grown up in a different time or family I would have explored it a lot earlier.

Do you currently have a favorite artist?

Yes! He has a studio in West Vancouver. Yates. He does all sorts of West Coast landscapes with nice palette and color.

Describe the Vancouver art scene in three words

I don’t really know it that well, but I would say there are a lot of different kinds of art so versatile, exciting, and welcoming. All of the people that I’ve met have been very positive.

What can’t she do? Meet International Artist and Super-Woman Marie-Anne Vorlet!

Marie-Anne Vorlet was born in the French part of Switzerland and raised as well as schooled in the German part of same country. After high school, no longer able to numb the urge to travel and experience the world, she looked for ‘portable’ work. She spent her first years as a working girl as a nanny in England, Cameroon (West Africa) as well as in Switzerland. During those much enjoyed years she developed a yearning for more knowledge which surprised her as she remembered school as a place of boredom. After earning the ‘Matura’, the Swiss school diploma required to enter any of the countries universities, a short detour to medical school helped Vorlet figure out what she did not want in life. It also allowed her to finance her years studying math, physics and astronomy. Working night shifts at the major teaching hospital in Zurich, teaching math as well as Tao Yoga on the side made ends meet. After these quite long years the travel bug hit again. Lucky enough to find a very flexible employer in one of the two big Swiss banks as well as work as a freelance translator, Vorlet explored parts of Europe, America, Nepal, Hawaii and South Africa. Crafting, especially sewing and knitting has been a hobby since age five, a year working in the shop of a avant-garde dress-maker in the late eighties, gave her the possibility to have a close look behind the scene. Statement: “No matter what I am doing, I am at my very best when dealing with a situation that is completely new to me. And I do love to create some

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Interview With Marie-Anne Vorlet

by Alyssa Laube  

About: Marie-Anne Vorlet, born and raised in Switzerland, is a woman of many titles – from world traveler and volunteer to artist and entrepeneur! For more information on Marie, visit:

http://www.thetinybigbag.net/MAVBio.htm

 Having grown up in the beautiful country of Switzerland, were you influenced by your roots? How so? 

Yes. I think my roots have indeed influenced me, especially the French Suisse part of them, as well as our beautiful landscapes. The Swiss “Frenchies” take life easier and appreciate beauty and the arts a lot!

You’ve spent a lot of time travelling in your life. How did this change you, both as a person and an artist?

Travelling is definitely my bliss in life. I love to see new landscapes and colors, taste new foods, and meet people with different ideas. Travelling and volunteering in Africa made me appreciate the many possibilities we have and tend to take for granted in the rich countries!

How does Vancouver compare to other cities that you have lived in?

I love and appreciate the proximity of big city-life and nature that Vancouver offers. It makes it a part of my “all-time favorite cities” list, which includes Zurich and Cape Town for the same reasons.

Have you always had an adoration for new experiences? 

Yes – I actually had a longing for the “new and exotic” since Primary School, which, as a child, made me devour books with a passion.

As a person who has tried many different occupations, do you feel that they were necessary in order to find your true passion?

Definitely! Nothing compares to personal experience.

What do you consider to be that passion?

Art, making new ideas work, i.e. creating my own NGO: www.educationwithouborders.ch, which was inspired by my Canadian friends. After volunteering regularly at and supporting my friend Heather Reynold’s orphanage, ‘God’s Golden Acre’ in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, for years, I strongly believe that education is a door opener!

How many languages do you speak?

Four: Swiss German, German, French and English – I have plans for learning Zulu as soon as I have more free time.

How was it beneficial to be multilingual, professionally? 

It has been very beneficial, especially in Zurich because this city is quite international in its focus.

What is your favorite place that you have been to or lived in?

Namibia – the desert colors are just divine! Paris: fashion, art, food – need I say more?

Many of your paintings focus largely on shape and color. Where did this fascination come from? 

It still surprises me how a different color can “change” a shape, it just never gets boring.

You have quite the variety of hobbies! Which ones do you still practice today?

Traveling and spending as much time outdoors, preferably in nature that has not been altered by humans.

Are there any that you would like to explore?

Yes, learning to fly!

A recent project of yours is The Tiny Big Bag, described as “The ultimate fashionable tote handbag (which) folds into handkerchief size.” Where did you get the inspiration for this idea? 

Moving to Vancouver many years ago (in 2000) from a country with very strict laws concerning the environment I was shocked to see that plastic bags were still free and used in enormous numbers in Canada. My cultural-shock-question was: “Would you like this double bagged?”


For original ideas such as The Tiny Big Bag, do you prefer to manage them individually or cooperatively with others? 

I would love to take a highly motivated partner on board – someone who has strengths I do not have myself!

Looking back on your journey, do you have any favorite/least favorite memories?

My favorite memories include the first time I saw the ocean (all the space!) after so many mountains at home. And, of course, the first trip I took out of Europe at the age of 17, which led me to Cameroon. Since then I am hooked! Africa is still my favorite continent!

Is there any point in your development as an artist that you regret or cherish most? 

I have few regrets in life! I cherish the fact that I am mostly self-taught in regards to my artwork. Curiosity is what keeps me going in life.

What are you looking forward to the most at this year’s Art Expo? 

The chance to meet people, see a lot of other peoples artwork and the possibility to show my work in a great location at Science World!

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