creativity

Final Call for our Art World Expo Christmas Fair Vendors! 

Are you an artisan or independent rep looking for a holiday event to participate in this year? Look no further and join our exciting Christmas Fair this year! 


We have a limited number of tables left for vendors at our Christmas Fair on December 16! Submit your registration today here: https://theartworldexpo.com/exhibitor-information/ Questions? Call Monika Blichar 6049996177 

We love to small businesses and Artisans and our Christmas Fair will be no exception to sharing the love for all things unique and local this December! 


Thank you to Two of Hearts boutique in Kits for donating $5-$25 gift cards to spend in store! Lots of raffle prizes every 30 minutes! 

Preview products, join the convo and connect with participants on our Official Facebook Event Page

When you attend this COMPLIMENTARY ENTRY EVENT, you’ll find: 
-Over 50 vendor tables including art, jewellery, fashion, hand knit goods, make up, skin care, chocolate, baked goods, kids accessories, essential oils, dog accessories, home decor, and health and wellness products and services and much more! Everything you need in one venue to complete your holiday shopping and networking! Ask our vendors about collaborations, participating in your events or if you’re a gallery or boutique owner, come browse to see if you could work with one of our Artisans in 2018! 


-Fashion Shows by John Pfaff, Carolyn Bruce Steampunk Jewellery, and West Coast Hatters on models provided by award winning female body builder fitness models from Team Fitness! Yes! Exciting! 


-Cheeses Crust Food Truck-Gourmet Grilled Cheese Sandwiches and Drinks! Really good sandwiches! 


-Raffles every 30 minutes-Prizes from local vendors and of course, many of our sponsors from Art World Expo! Tickets sold on site! 

-First 100 people through the doors receive a complimentary goody bag! No purchase necessary! Just be one of the first 100 people at 11:00am sharp! 

-Face Painting for kids and adults by award winning body painter and visual artist Francoise Boise ($10/person) She’s amazing! Don’t worry, she will do Holiday themed paints too! 


-Silent Auction Benefiting Make and Break Arts Foundation-all proceeds support independent Artisans and Arts Programs and Exhibitions in BC. It’s a win win! (Huge line up of awesome stuff to bid on-great for holiday gift ideas and of course-gifts for ourselves!) 

-Arts & Crafts Station for Kids-leave them at the craft station and go shop and mingle! We have you covered! 

-Finally, when you’re all done, take a photo at our photo booth with visitors from the North Pole! Capture a memory and celebrate Christmas 2017 with us! 

Current vendors: 

Monika Blichar

Art by Edy

Carolyn Bruce Designs – Steampunk Jewelry**FASHION SHOW**

West Coast Hatters**FASHION SHOW**

John Pfaff Art & Fashion**FASHION SHOW**

Fashion Show models sponsored by Team Fitness-Award Winning Female Body Builders from BC! 

LumberJax Custom Wooden Jewelry 

Karolyn’s Tupperware

Inner Harmonious Peace

Kathline Essential Oils Accessories

Jennifer Haase, Mary Kay Independent Beauty Consultant

SPOIL YOURSELF, Cristina De Vellis

Jessica’s Homemade Alfajores-Baked Goods

Fifth Avenue Collection by Pardeep

Younique, Amanda Cherewick

The Sweet Doodle

Whisk Premium Matcha

Copper Paw Designs

Coastal Storm Gallery

Dagmar Doubkova Herbal Life

Bodacious Butterflies

Scentsy Kristi Weaver

SweetLegs Vancouver with Julia

Love Eco Jewels

Spain Gourmet Canada

Radiant Life Hoops & Styles 

Petite Hippo

Earth Meets Spirit

Boise Art Works-Face Painting for Kids On Site $10/each

Deanna ArtFORMS

Diamond Movement

Andrea Renée Blackett MONAT

Diva’s Niche

All Day Shine by Julie SeneGence Independent Distributor # 384814

Crafts By Julia

Bryce Musil Azrael’s Forge Gems and Fine Jewelry

Taylore Mcmanne Jewellery
 

Advertisements

Ryan McGee-Weird Art & Lowbrow Charm

by Monika Blichar

I have long admired artists who push boundaries and when selecting artists to participate in our events, I always strive to reach artists who are different, fresh and new in their work. When I came across Ryan McGee’s work, I noticed something ‘je ne sais’ quoi about it. It’s dark but delightful. It’s strange and sublime. He examines life through a distorted lens. I loved it the moment I saw it and knew that we had to feature him in our Toronto event on November 17. I caught up with Ryan to ask him about his art. Enjoy!

 

1-When did you start making art?

I can’t pin point exactly when I started making art, for me it was something that just had to happen, I always had a need to express myself visually. When I was younger this took the form of drawing on walls and filling up sketchbooks with crude doodles. It wasn’t until my time in College that I started to really to think critically about what my art was, and what I wanted to put out into the world.

2-What inspires you to create?

I have always had a very strong interest in the weird, and this fuels me in everything I create. I pull from everything that strikes a cord with me on a personal level, and things that capture the underground culture I love. I often find myself collecting outdated horror and sci-fi comics, saving images of early surfer, and hot rod culture, and tuning in to a new band that connect with me. All of these elements get archived in somewhat of a nexus of inspiration for me to draw from.


3-How do you think art can change society?

I believe that art is extensive, and reaches just about everyone through various outlets. In my case I always wanted to create art but I never truly felt comfortable in the fine art culture, so I sought out sub art groups to get into. I think that’s the truly amazing thing about art is that there really is something out there for everyone to connect with. There will always be a steady flow of talented people who want to create, and express themselves. As long as art continues to have various outlets for these people to grow creatively then there will always be potential to change society by pushing new ideas, and concepts through their works.

4-Do you try to convey messages through your illustrations?

There is a certain charm I believe in lowbrow art, and this is something a try and capture in my pieces. I like to play with the imagination of the viewer through my strange, and sometimes-goofy pieces, I think this connects with the onlooker reminding them that art can fun. If my work has any type of message I would say it’s for people to take a step back, and not take themselves so seriously.


5-Where do you see yourself in your art business in the next five years?

I would love to have really established myself at least within the Toronto art community in the coming years. My dream would be to sustain myself entirely on my art, and that is something that I am really working on accomplishing. I think it is important especially for artists to set goals set for themselves and their art, and to always be striving to grow creatively, and professionally.

6-What kinds of works will you have for sale at Art World Toronto? Will you be offering attendees any show specials?

I will have a variety of pieces available for sale at Art World Toronto from patches to stickers to prints. In terms of special offers I really value meeting, and networking with new people at these events. Chances are if you come and say hi you’ll end up with a discount on some pieces, or maybe some stickers for free.

To order tickets to the Toronto Art World Expo, please visit This Link

Art Workbook by Founder Monika Blichar Helps Spark Creativity

“You’re Going to Make It-A Creativity Workbook to Help You Make Your Best Art!” by Founder of Art World Expo Monika Blichar has been a real hit this summer!

bookcover2

Monika has been working with emerging and established artists since 2009 via various projects including teaching at MAB Art Studio & Boutique Gallery in North Vancouver. In response reflections about how to help people be more creative in their art and lives, she put together a unique workbook to help even the most beginner artist ignite creativity!

Inside students can complete 10 exercises on things like highlighting, shading, perspective, colour wheel and even some work on portraiture. Monika also included some inspirational worksheets that will help anyone pin-point what they would like to do with their creativity and take action steps to achieve those goals. Blichar says that fostering the desire to create is crucial to well being and spurring imagination. She can’t live without creating and attributes her own creativity to doing something right-brained every day. “Whatever it is that you would like to create,” she says, “it can be nurtured and developed with an open-mind, dedication and most importantly, fun!”

Monika is always giving back to the arts community through fundraising and this is just another way for her to help others start their own work and be sure they understand the fundamentals of art. The first 100 books help support facility costs at MAB Art Studio & Boutique Gallery. So far, Blichar has sold 80 copies! Help her meet the goal by ordering an Ebook Here!

Bringing New Meaning to “Language Arts”

An Interview with Cristina Petersen

by Alyssa Laube

cristinapetersen

 

About: After returning to her home town of Vancouver after 14 years, Cristina Petersen now works as a painter and ESL instructor at the University of British Columbia. She is new to showing her work, and looks forward to developing and improving as an artist.

 cristinapetersen2

As a newcomer to the Art World Expo, what are you expecting?

 

I am expecting to talk and connect with a lot of like-minded people, and to have fun being involved in such a great and vibrant event! I hope to sell some work, but I think that just being there is a step towards even considering myself as a real artist.

 

You are new to showing your art. How did you decide to do that, and what was your experience like?

 

I was encouraged by Monika to do more art and to get it out there, but also met a local artist in my neighbourhood named Marty Andaluz. I worked with him to have my first art show, along with two of my friends, who are also new to art. We had fun organizing it together at a local café, Room for Cream on Kingsway. It also helped to have encouragement from my fiancé, Tom, as well as family and friends who support this new adventure of mine.

 

You’re juggling two jobs – as an artist, of course, but also as an instructor at UBC! What is that like for you?

 

It’s very difficult to find time sometimes to paint, as teaching is a very demanding job. I love teaching and it is my priority of course, but I try to paint on weekends or when I feel inspired.

 

You’ve mentioned that you love to write. What do you enjoy writing? Have you ever considered this as a career?

 

I like to write blogs sometimes for my work. They are about teaching. Writing is just a fun way to express myself about things I’m passionate about. I have toyed with the idea of going into editing as I have a keen eye for errors, having taught ESL for about 13 years now. But ultimately, I am very social and think that being a writer might be too isolated for me…perhaps something later in life! I am always open to trying new things.

 

Do you think being in Ecuador will be an artistic inspiration for you?

 

Yes of course, traveling is always an inspiration. New experiences are what keep things fresh.

 

How has working as an artist affected your work as an instructor, and vice versa?

 

I am not sure that it has affected my work as an instructor, but sometimes I feel like teaching language is a very creative job. When I am in the classroom, I can create a mood or focus on certain things, much like painting. Although with my job, there are administrative duties that sometimes zap my creative side and make me wish I were just able to paint!

 

What subject(s) do you teach?

 

I teach English as an additional language. I teach in different programs all the time, so sometimes I teach in the Intensive English Program, (IEP) or the English for Academic Purposes (EAP), the English for the Global Citizen (EGC) or Explore (with French Canadians). I teach all the skills, but if teaching IEP or EAP I usually try to pick the Speaking and Listening classes or writing courses. I like teaching Speaking because I like to facilitate discussions, teach presentation skills etc. Writing essays is a bit of an art form too. I have always loved to write as well.

 

You work in acrylics. What makes you choose it?

 

Mostly because they are forgiving and easy to clean, as I usually paint in my apartment, so I have to set up everything and take it all down at the end. Cleaning brushes etc. is way easier. I also like to add water or Gesso, sometimes crackle paste for variety as they mix well. I can add oil on top if I want more texture later.

cristinapetersen3

 

What are the most important things in your life?

 

Things or people? *laughs* My fiancé, my family, my friends, my dog… but aside from that, being a given, I love horseback riding and skiing; those are the two hobbies that I am passionate about. I try to stay healthy by exercising and eating healthy, delicious food. I enjoy a good glass of red wine, living a simple life, and travelling when I can to explore the world – particularly foreign places where I don’t speak the language. I’ve been studying Spanish off an on for about 10 years.

 

Do you have any significant goals for the future?

 

Well, I am getting married next June, so my fiancé and I are planning our wedding. We are saving money right now and also hoping to take our honeymoon in Ecuador. Hopefully sell more art to help fundraise.

cristinapetersen4

Can you think of a particular moment or person that inspired you to become an artist?

 

My half-sister Dana loves to paint and is really quite talented. I think she will surpass my skills! I bought her a painting lesson almost 3 years ago with Monika and went with her. This was my first painting lesson too, and ever since then, with Monika’s encouragement, I have kept painting. I have always loved art and art galleries too. I think it was always in me, but it was a matter of being in the right head space to pull it out. And to have that initial “ah ha!” moment, like “Wow, that was really fun, I want to do more of that!” Now I am older and have found my path as an instructor, so I feel like expanding my horizons and trying new things. Learn new skills. Be creative. Always grow as a person.

 

Do you find that, on a bad day, painting can make you feel better?

 

Yes, of course. It is very calming and therapeutic. You can lose yourself in the art and not worry about anything else. Although I have to tell myself sometimes not to be a perfectionist. I like to paint with bigger brush strokes and more abstract style on days where I need a release.

 

Is there a specific technique that you like to use or find interesting?

 

I love work by Dali, it’s so weird and crazy, as well as work by the Group of Seven. I really like abstract scenery and more free flowing brush strokes. Not really schooled in art, so not sure of any specific techniques, but I know I am still experimenting and learning a lot.

 

How do you hope to improve as an artist?

 

I hope to improve my ability to draw or paint specific features like eyes, noses and mouths. I also hope to let go of my own criticism of my own work. I have to accept that not all pieces turn out quite how I envision them, but sometimes that is the beauty of it.

Unexpected Beauty

An Interview with Robyn Marshall

By Alyssa Laube

robynbyrd1

About: Robyn Marshall is a multi-talented artist who’s goal is “to bring beauty to the disturbing and awareness to the misunderstood.” She was raised in Ottawa, Ontario and now lives with her family in Chilliwack, British Columbia. As a full-time artist and stay-at-home mom, her life’s focus is on her children and business, Robyn Byrd Design.

 

You seem to like to focus on darker subjects and to give them exposure. What about the unusual, hidden, and forgotten interests you and inspires you to create art?

I’ve always preferred and been drawn the the unusual, darker things in life. I was an inner city missionary for over 3 years. I think you have to have a heart for the hidden and forgotten in order to help the homeless, drug addicts, prostitutes etc.

It’s that same heart that I use to create my art. To create things out of the normal, not cookie-cutter, but things that take you a second to think. It’s similar to how I so wished people would take a second to think and care about the homeless.

 

These words also evoke thoughts of political and social issues. Is that something you

involve yourself in as an artist?

As a missionary I was extremely involved. It’s what drove me to try and get people to be more aware and help the helpless. As an artist, I’ve donated paintings and help raise money for charities.

If you wanted to dig even deeper, you could say that my “PS-Portraits and Silhouettes” collection is a derivative of this. Where some of the paintings have no faces, or a majority of their eyes are closed. I think I was so drawn to paint this series because it best reflects society’s response to the homeless and helpless. The face is what draws you in and helps you read people, so if a person in a painting has no face or it’s just their silhouette, are they still a person? These are some of the questions I hope people have when viewing this series.

 

Are there any political/social events that have had an impact on you recently, creatively or otherwise?

 The 2010 Olympics had a big impact on me. It broke my heart to see our province pour so much time and money into the event when I know how all of that money could help the less fortunate.

I find, as a whole society, we have forgotten about the people next door to us. It’s easier to have empathy for the orphan babies of Africa or the survivors of major natural disasters as apposed to the people on Main and Hastings Street. We have a prejudice which leads us to believe that, because they are homeless, they somehow chose to be; That they are accepting this lifestyle and don’t want it to change.

 

Are you with any philanthropic foundations or companies?

I was a missionary with YWAM “Youth With A Mission”  and I served with them here in Vancouver, Tijuana, and Atalanta, Georgia.

 

You aim to takes societys conventions and turn(s) them upside down. Do you do this simply to cause controversy, to cause the audience to question themselves, etc.?

I do it to challenge people; To cause people to think for themselves and to question the everyday status quo.

 

How do you go about doing the above?

I think that I accomplish that simply by being a young, female artist who prefers to paint skulls instead of pretty landscapes.

 

Are the ideas conveyed by your artwork necessarily and consistently your own individual opinion, or do you like to expand on foreign opinions and concepts?

I think it’s a bit of both. My opinions and outlooks on life have been majorly moulded and formed by worldly concepts. I try not to live by “western” ideals and concepts where it’s every man for himself and to do anything for the all-mighty dollar. I’ve learned and been exposed to too much about the world as a whole to remain sheltered and naive. I hope my art reflects that.

 

How have your experiences in life formed your identity as an artist today?

My life has been so diverse in itself. From being a hairdresser in Ottawa, to a missionary in Atlanta and now a full-time artist in British Columbia, I’ve never settled on one way of living. This is directly represented in my art. Not one style is the same. Not one medium is the same. My collection of work varies just like my life has.

robynbyrd3

What began your interest with medical texts? How did you indulge that interest?

I was obsessed with Leonardo DaVinci growing up. My earliest memories are of reading about how he would rob graves and use the cadavers as references for his drawings. He drastically changed medicine of that day by being able to provide illustrations of how the human body works.

Because of this, at age of 8 or 9, all I wanted to do when I grew up was illustrate medical textbooks. So, as an adult, I decided to live a form of this dream by drawing oversized medical illustrations.

 

How long does it take you to complete an average medical piece?

This all depends on my children. Being a stay-at-home mom and artist means finding a balance between drawing and raising my children. Ideally, each one takes about a week – about 20-25 hours of work total.

I draw them on pieces of paper hung on my kitchen wall. My days are often spent drawing while my children play with Play-Doh at the kitchen table.

 

Now that you are creating them, what do you find is your favourite thing about it?

I love everything about them. The sheer fact that I am living an almost 20 year-old dream from when I was a little girl is amazing. That, and the size. I love working in these large scales. I’ve had to develop different techniques and I love every second of it.

 

Each type of art you do must be drastically different. How do you use these forms to create different feelings? Which is your favourite right now?

Yes they are all quite different. I love the soft tones and values of watercolour. They provide a sense of vulnerability that I find appealing. My large scale medical illustrations are bold and “in your face”. They call for your attention. They force you to address them.These two rotate between my favourite styles, depending on my feelings that day.

 

You were raised in Ottowa, Ontario. How did the culture there affect your development, personally and artistically?

I think that growing up in such a culturally diverse city helped shape my outlook on the world as well as my art. I was exposed to so many amazing varieties of arts and cultures, it’s hard to not have it affect you.

 

Could you tell the story of how you began working with large-scale acrylics?

It was a high school art project. I built, stretched and painted my first 5 foot painting and I fell in love. I continued with them for many years. I liked how it involved my whole body, how it was therapeutic to be able to whirl my arms around freely.

 

There is a reoccurring appearance of skulls and bone in your work. What is the meaning behind them to you, and why do focus on it in your work?

I’ve always been drawn to skulls and things that are macabre. I like the reminder that death is close, so live for the day. Fulfill your dreams today and don’t wait. We don’t know how long we have and tomorrow may never come. It’s a reminder to live without regret and to seize the day.

 

What is your goal as an artist, in the present and future?

My goal is just to continue to draw and paint and put my art out there. By doing so, I have since been published in a collaborative art book, and now i’m able to be featured in this event. If people like what I do and it resonates with them, great! I don’t make art for other people or with the thought of “will this sell?”. I paint what moves me in that time and stay true to myself.

 

To learn more about Robyn and Robyn Byrd Design, visit http://www.robynbyrddesign.com/

robynbyrd2

robynbyrd4

Little Monsters at Art World Expo!

Interview with…

Little Monsters Studio 

by Monika Blichar 

 

 

Meet Artist Kathleen Erickson from Little Monsters Studio! 

A first time competitor, we are very excited to see what this Monster can do! Apart from having amazingly talented creative skills in face and body painting, Kat is also an accomplished visual artist creating unique pieces like custom paintings and growth charts for kids. We caught up with Kat and asked her a few questions about her experience as an artist in B.C. Here is what she had to say! 

 

Image

When did you start doing face/body painting?

I took a more serious approach to my painting when I turned 15 and being an artist; I was always experimenting creatively with my children and painting their faces. This helped me transition into starting Little Monsters Studio three years ago.

 Image

Your family and work seem to blend together. How have your kids helped you with your inspiration for your business?

I find with maturity, I sometimes start to take a more scientific approach to my art. So having children helps to keep my art especially my body art & face painting fresh & unconventional.

My children & their friends always want their faces painted and it makes for great family outings like going to the Vancouver Zombie Walk or getting painted for a Seahawks game with my husband.

 

This is the first time you are competing in Art World Expo body painting competition. What are you looking forward to the most as a first time competitor?

The competitive nature of any competition will only help me to improve in my craft and with my confidence. But what I’m really looking forward to is being surrounded by so many exceptional artists and talented people.  Just being part of this contagious atmosphere and networking with my peers, will be stimulating enough. Then there’s all the great art.

 

What kinds of services and merchandise do you offer the public?

Face painting & body art are my primary sources of income, but I also sell my paintings and growth charts. During the month of October, I open up my studio to work on big Halloween projects for costume competitions and parties.

 

What is your biggest dream regarding your art and business?

My goal is to be able to support my self enough, so I am able to continue to focus on projects that I love. I adore body art and especially the Halloween spirit and just being able to continue to grow in this realm would be ideal.

 

Image

Welcome to the show Kat! Wishing you good luck! 

 

For more information about Little Monsters Studio, please visit Kat and her troop on her Facebook site: https://www.facebook.com/littlemonstersstudio?ref=br_tf

 

A Man of Many Talents-Yves Decary

yves1yves2

About:

Yves Decary is not your typical salon owner. Owner of L’atelier Hair Boutique & Gallery in the Yaletown district in Vancouver, BC, this man has many talents. L’Atelier is a full service studio and gallery where local artists are able to show and sell original art work in a welcoming, edgy and vibrant environment. Clients are able to come in, be pampered by a master stylist team, but also engage with Vancouver’s artistic merit, which is evidently bustling as seen from the variety of work found at the salon. Yves not only styles, but also enjoys painting which has led to multiple live painting performances, numerous sales and an upcoming show at Roam Gallery.

yves3

Yves Decary-Interview by Alyssa Laube

How is L’Atelier Hair different from other salons?

At l’Atelier, we consider hair to be an art we are creating with scissors, paint brushes, and color. A new look for client, it is why we are different.

How were you introduced to hair styling and cosmetics?
I have always been interested in and curious about fashion because fashion is an art statement. It’s why I decided to become a hairstylist when I was 18 years old.
Why do you think it’s important that you sell local art at L’Atelier?

Our mirrors are framed like a painting and so, our client is our blank canvas. It also makes us proud to support local artists and artisans in our gallery.

When/how did you transition from selling art to creating it?

I started to paint 8 years ago and learned to express my emotion and state of mind on canvas.

To you, what is the meaning of art?

I think, if you paint with your soul, that is the true meaning of art.

As a man who is involved in both art and hair styling, where does your true passion lie?

I love edgy, raw, and sexy emotion. It is what defines me as an artist.

What do you consider your specialty?

I love to analyze people and emotion that is under the surface.

With so many unique designs and ideas, where do you gather inspiration?

My inspiration always come from my experience in life and the human beings that crossed my path.

How has your culture influenced you as an artist?

Fashion has always been a big influence on my journey of creating art.

You’ve also had a salon in Montreal, but moved to Vancouver. How would you describe that process, in a word?

Circus, because most of the time, life is like a circus!

How have you developed as an artist over the years?

Around 3 years ago, I started to mainly paint with my 3 favorite colors: black, red, and white.

What are you looking forward to most at this year’s Expo?

This year, I am looking forward to being part of the Expo again. I love the team. I’m looking forward to sharing my emotion with Vancouver, as well as the artist crowd and sharing the true meaning of art with the audience.

For more information about L’Atelier or Yves, please visit: https://www.facebook.com/groups/432888750122625/

yves4

Interview with Artist Elaine Kao-Power Ranger at Heart

Elaine Kao Kao_Elaine_2014_2 Kao_Elaine_2014

Founder of Art World Expo, Monika Blichar goes into interview mode with AWE 2014 Exhibitors to search for the meaning of art, the stories within each artist, and the inspirations behind creativity to be found at Art World Expo 2014 in Vancouver, BC. Presenting Elaine Kao, Dino & Panda Inc. 

Elaine Kao~Power Ranger at Heart

As a returning artist from Victoria, BC, Elaine has demonstrated growth and artistic transformation since participating for the first time in 2012. Her art and style is not only eye catching, light and fun, but the message that she holds behind the creativity she pours out into doodles, canvas and merchandise is by far the best part of why it is so important to support the arts in our regions as well as globally. Quoting from her fan page which now has over 54,000 fans on Facebook, her motto is “Art work dedicated to making you smile”.  Simply perfect.

1) When did you start making art?

My parents say I used to draw snowmen when I was maybe 3 or 4 years old (holding the crayons with a fist). My first big inspiration for wanting to be an artist was after watching Sailor Moon (a Japanese animation) when I was in grade 1. After that I spent most of my time drawing the characters and became really interested in the Japanese anime style of art. I always enjoyed art class throughout grade school. In grade 12, my art teacher let me do my own thing in the back of the room because he knew I could do the exercises he was making everyone else do. That was the first time I painted on canvas with acrylics. Then, against the will of my parents, I applied and got accepted into the Visual Arts program at the University of Victoria.

2) How do you feel about the art scene in our province?

I don’t know about the rest of the province, but I always find that Vancouver Island, and Vancouver have lots of exciting things going on. The art scene is definitely growing every day as young artists are being given more and more opportunities to show and share their work and love of art. I especially love events that bring the community together. One of my favorite events is the annual Art Gallery Paint-In (Victoria, BC.)

3) Describe your goals for your art practice.

My goals in art and everything is to become better and better, and perhaps along the way discover new skills and talents. Recently I’ve been really interested in the 3D painting of Riusuke Fukahori and Keng Lye. I’ve been busy with school so I haven’t had a chance to experiment with resin and painting 3D yet, but one day! On my Dino & Panda fanpage my tagline is “Artwork dedicated to making you smile.” I’d say that’s my biggest goal and motivation when I’m making art. Of course, I’m only human, and I have some sad days which gets translated into my artwork, but I think my fans can connect with those moments too, because I believe I’m not the only one dealing with the curve balls life throws.

4) How has Social Media helped your art career? (specifically your 54,000+ fans on Facebook)

At first, I was just using social media to share my artwork and random doodles with my friends but it quickly grew into an awesome way to spread my work even farther…all the way around the world, in fact! I think it’s the greatest motivation to have people from all over the world connecting with my artwork and cheering me on even when I’m down  I know everyone says this, but I have the best fans ever! Fans sometimes send me messages about commissions or drawing requests which I’m happy to work on. Other fans message me just to tell me their story about how one of my drawings may have held special meaning for them and made them feel better after a bad day. Without social media it wouldn’t be possible to connect with so many people.

5) Do you have any special talents or interesting goals you would like readers to know about you?

I’ve been playing the piano since I was 6, and the ukulele since grade 6. I actually teach piano and ukulele! I’m also practicing guitar on my own. I love to sing and I have a bunch of cover songs on Youtube in a few different languages. Other than music, I am a language nerd and there are 7 languages I want to become fluent in (Mandarin, Korean, Japanese, Italian, Spanish, French, and Greek.) I also speak Cantonese 

6) If you could do anything you wanted, what would it be?

I would be a Power Ranger. Other than that I’m pretty much doing what I want right now, working hard on becoming an awesome teacher!

7) Who inspires you to make art?

Everyone, everything, everywhere and anywhere. From real people to fictional characters, everyone has a story to share and there’s bound to be something interesting!

8) Where can readers purchase your art?

I haven’t had time to look into establishing an online store, and I also don’t have much merchandise yet, but if anyone is interested they can just send me an email, or message on the fanpage. Everyone is welcome to visit me at the Art World Expo, of course! Become a fan of my Dino & Panda and I’ll post updates whenever I will be appearing in art shows!

9) Why do you feel art is important to the individual and to society?

I think art is important to the individual and the society because it’s a way to express opinions, and feelings which may be hard to put into words. Personally, art has been a very important aspect of my life because I’m inherently introverted and I used to be the shyest person you could ever meet. Without art and music as outlets I might as well have been invisible, letting everything, good and bad, build up inside until I explode and disappear. It’s important to understand that you are a valuable person within a society and your story is worth sharing. No one is ever really alone, after all! Besides, creating art is, in most cases, the least destructive thing a person can do when dealing with anger, frustration, and all those negative emotions. Even if a person claims to be the most artistically challenged person in the world, they can still appreciate and connect with the visual stimuli they encounter in their surroundings.

10) Lastly, what do you like about being in the Art World Expo showcase?

I love being a part of the Art World Expo because I get to see many different styles and disciplines of art from many artists. It’s both inspiring and encouraging. Because I’ve been in the Art World Expo for a few years now, it’s exciting to see every aspect of the show improving each year.

To learn more about Elaine and Dino & Panda Inc., visit her fan page on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/Dino.Panda.Inc